This is a mirror page, please see the original page:

https://xmake.io/#/manual/custom_rule

After the 2.2.1 release, xmake not only natively supports the construction of multi-language files, but also allows users to implement complex unknown file builds by custom building rules.

Custom build rules can have a set of file extensions associated to them using set_extensions.
Once these extensions are associated to the rule a later call to add_files will automatically use this custom rule.
Here is an example rule that will use Pandoc to convert markdown files added to a build target in to HTML files:

-- Define a build rule for a markdown file
rule("markdown")
    set_extensions(".md", ".markdown")
    on_build_file(function (target, sourcefile, opt)
        import("core.project.depend")
        import("utils.progress") -- it only for v2.5.9, we need use print to show progress below v2.5.8

        -- make sure build directory exists
        os.mkdir(target:targetdir())

        -- replace .md with .html
        local targetfile = path.join(target:targetdir(), path.basename(sourcefile) .. ".html")

        -- only rebuild the file if its changed since last run
        depend.on_changed(function ()
            -- call pandoc to make a standalone html file from a markdown file
            os.vrunv('pandoc', {"-s", "-f", "markdown", "-t", "html", "-o", targetfile, sourcefile})
            progress.show(opt.progress, "${color.build.object}markdown %s", sourcefile)
        end, {files = sourcefile})
    end)

target("test")
    set_kind("object")

    -- make the test target support the construction rules of the markdown file
    add_rules("markdown")

    -- adding a markdown file to build
    add_files("src/*.md")
    add_files("src/*.markdown")

Note that in xmake a rule is responsible for checking when targets are out of date and informing the user of ongoing progress.

There is also an alternative to on_build_file in the form of on_build_files which allows you to process the entire set of files in one function call.

A second form called on_buildcmd_file and on_buildcmd_files is instead declarative; rather than running arbitrary Lua to build a target it runs Lua to learn how those targets are built.
The advantage to buildcmd is that those rules can be exported to makefiles which do not require xmake at all in order to run.

We can use buildcmd to simplify it further, like this:

-- Define a build rule for a markdown file
rule("markdown")
    set_extensions(".md", ".markdown")
    on_buildcmd_file(function (target, batchcmds, sourcefile, opt)

        -- make sure build directory exists
        batchcmds:mkdir(target:targetdir())

        -- replace .md with .html
        local targetfile = path.join(target:targetdir(), path.basename(sourcefile) .. ".html")

        -- call pandoc to make a standalone html file from a markdown file
        batchcmds:vrunv('pandoc', {"-s", "-f", "markdown", "-t", "html", "-o", targetfile, sourcefile})
        batchcmds:show_progress(opt.progress, "${color.build.object}markdown %s", sourcefile)

        -- only rebuild the file if its changed since last run
        batchcmds:add_depfiles(sourcefile)
    end)

target("test")
    set_kind("object")

    -- make the test target support the construction rules of the markdown file
    add_rules("markdown")

    -- adding a markdown file to build
    add_files("src/*.md")
    add_files("src/*.markdown")

Files can be assigned to a specific rule regardless of their file extension. You do this by setting the rule custom property when adding the file like in the following example:

target("test")
    add_files("src/test/*.md.in", {rule = "markdown"})

A target can be superimposed to apply multiple rules to more customize its own build behavior, and even support different build environments.

!> Rules specified by add_files("*.md", {rule = "markdown"}), with a higher priority than the rule set by add_rules("markdown").

Built-in rules

sinceAfter the 2.2.1 release, xmake provides some built-in rules to simplify the daily xmake.lua description and support for some common build environments.

We can view the complete list of built-in rules by running the following command:

$ xmake show -l rules

mode.debug

Add the configuration rules for the debug compilation mode for the current project xmake.lua, for example:

add_rules("mode.debug")

Equivalent to:

if is_mode("debug") then
    set_symbols("debug")
    set_optimize("none")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m debug.

mode.release

Add the configuration rules for the release compilation mode for the current project xmake.lua, for example:

add_rules("mode.release")

Equivalent to:

if is_mode("release") then
    set_symbols("hidden")
    set_optimize("fastest")
    set_strip("all")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m release.

mode.releasedbg

Add the configuration rules for the releasedbg compilation mode for the current project xmake.lua, for example:

add_rules("mode.releasedbg")

!> Compared with the release mode, this mode will also enable additional debugging symbols, which is usually very useful.

Equivalent to:

if is_mode("releasedbg") then
    set_symbols("debug")
    set_optimize("fastest")
    set_strip("all")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m releasedbg.

mode.minsizerel

Add the configuration rules for the minsizerel compilation mode for the current project xmake.lua, for example:

add_rules("mode.minsizerel")

!> Compared with the release mode, this mode is more inclined to the minimum code compilation optimization, rather than speed priority.

相当于:

if is_mode("minsizerel") then
    set_symbols("hidden")
    set_optimize("smallest")
    set_strip("all")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m minsizerel.

mode.check

Add the check compilation mode configuration rules for the current project xmake.lua, generally used for memory detection, for example:

add_rules("mode.check")

Equivalent to:

if is_mode("check") then
    set_symbols("debug")
    set_optimize("none")
    add_cxflags("-fsanitize=address", "-ftrapv")
    add_mxflags("-fsanitize=address", "-ftrapv")
    add_ldflags("-fsanitize=address")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m check.

mode.profile

Add configuration rules for the profile compilation mode for the current project xmake.lua, which is generally used for performance analysis, for example:

add_rules("mode.profile")

Equivalent to:

if is_mode("profile") then
    set_symbols("debug")
    add_cxflags("-pg")
    add_ldflags("-pg")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m profile.

mode.coverage

Add the configuration rules for the coverage compilation mode for the current project xmake.lua, which is generally used for coverage analysis, for example:

add_rules("mode.coverage")

Equivalent to:

if is_mode("coverage") then
    add_cxflags("--coverage")
    add_mxflags("--coverage")
    add_ldflags("--coverage")
end

We can switch to this compilation mode by xmake f -m coverage.

mode.valgrind

This mode provides valgrind memory analysis and detection support.

add_rules("mode.valgrind")

We can switch to this compilation mode by: xmake f -m valgrind.

mode.asan

This mode provides AddressSanitizer memory analysis and detection support.

add_rules("mode.asan")

We can switch to this compilation mode by: xmake f -m asan.

mode.tsan

This mode provides ThreadSanitizer memory analysis and detection support.

add_rules("mode.tsan")

We can switch to this compilation mode by: xmake f -m tsan.

mode.lsan

This mode provides LeakSanitizer memory analysis and detection support.

add_rules("mode.lsan")

We can switch to this compilation mode by: xmake f -m lsan.

mode.ubsan

This mode provides UndefinedBehaviorSanitizer memory analysis and detection support.

add_rules("mode.ubsan")

We can switch to this compilation mode by: xmake f -m ubsan.

qt.static

A static library program used to compile and generate Qt environments:

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.static")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")
    add_frameworks("QtNetwork", "QtGui")

qt.shared

Dynamic library program for compiling and generating Qt environment:

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.shared")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")
    add_frameworks("QtNetwork", "QtGui")

qt.console

A console program for compiling and generating a Qt environment:

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.console")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")

qt.quickapp

Quick(qml) ui application for compiling and generating Qt environment.

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.quickapp")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")
    add_files("src/qml.qrc")

qt.quickapp_static

Quick(qml) ui application (statically linked version) for compiling and generating Qt environment.

!> Need to switch to static library version Qt SDK

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.quickapp_static")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")
    add_files("src/qml.qrc")

qt.widgetapp

Used to compile Qt Widgets (ui/moc) applications

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.widgetapp")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")
    add_files("src/mainwindow.ui")
    add_files("src/mainwindow.h") -- add meta header files with Q_OBJECT

qt.widgetapp_static

Used to compile Qt Widgets (ui/moc) applications (static library version)

!> Need to switch to static library version Qt SDK

target("test")
    add_rules("qt.widgetapp_static")
    add_files("src/*.cpp")
    add_files("src/mainwindow.ui")
    add_files("src/mainwindow.h") -- add meta header files with Q_OBJECT

For more descriptions of Qt, see: #160

xcode.bundle

Used to compile and generate ios/macos bundle program

target("test")
     add_rules("xcode.bundle")
     add_files("src/*.m")
     add_files("src/Info.plist")

xcode.framework

Used to compile and generate ios/macos framework program

target("test")
     add_rules("xcode.framework")
     add_files("src/*.m")
     add_files("src/Info.plist")

xcode.application

Used to compile and generate ios/macos applications

target("test")
     add_rules("xcode.application")
     add_files("src/*.m", "src/**.storyboard", "src/*.xcassets")
     add_files("src/Info.plist")

wdk.env.kmdf

Application of the compilation environment setting of kmdf under WDK, need to cooperate with: wdk.[driver|binary|static|shared] and other rules to use.

wdk.env.umdf

Application of the umdf compiler environment settings under WDK, you need to cooperate with: wdk.[driver|binary|static|shared] and other rules to use.

wdk.env.wdm

Application wdm compiler environment settings under WDK, need to cooperate with: wdk.[driver|binary|static|shared] and other rules to use.

wdk.driver

Compile and generate drivers based on the WDK environment under Windows. Currently, only the WDK10 environment is supported.

Note: need to cooperate: wdk.env.[umdf|kmdf|wdm]Environmental rules are used.

-- add target
target("echo")

    -- add rules
    add_rules("wdk.driver", "wdk.env.kmdf")

    -- add files
    add_files("driver/*.c")
    add_files("driver/*.inx")

    -- add includedirs
    add_includedirs("exe")

wdk.binary

Compile and generate executable programs based on WDK environment under Windows. Currently, only WDK10 environment is supported.

Note: It is necessary to cooperate with: environment rules such as wdk.env.[umdf|kmdf|wdm].

-- add target
target("app")

    -- add rules
    add_rules("wdk.binary", "wdk.env.umdf")

    -- add files
    add_files("exe/*.cpp")

wdk.static

Compile and generate static library programs based on WDK environment under Windows. Currently, only WDK10 environment is supported.

Note: It is necessary to cooperate with: environment rules such as wdk.env.[umdf|kmdf|wdm].

target("nonpnp")

    -- add rules
    add_rules("wdk.static", "wdk.env.kmdf")

    -- add flags for rule: wdk.tracewpp
    add_values("wdk.tracewpp.flags", "-func:TraceEvents(LEVEL,FLAGS,MSG,...)", "-func:Hexdump((LEVEL,FLAGS,MSG,...))")

    -- add files
    add_files("driver/*.c", {rule = "wdk.tracewpp"})

wdk.shared

Compile and generate dynamic library programs based on WDK environment under Windows. Currently, only WDK10 environment is supported.

Note: It is necessary to cooperate with: environment rules such as wdk.env.[umdf|kmdf|wdm].

target("nonpnp")

    -- add rules
    add_rules("wdk.shared", "wdk.env.wdm")

    -- add flags for rule: wdk.tracewpp
    add_values("wdk.tracewpp.flags", "-func:TraceEvents(LEVEL,FLAGS,MSG,...)", "-func:Hexdump((LEVEL,FLAGS,MSG,...))")

    -- add files
    add_files("driver/*.c", {rule = "wdk.tracewpp"})

wdk.tracewpp

Used to enable tracewpp to preprocess source files:

target("nonpnp")

    -- add rules
    add_rules("wdk.driver", "wdk.env.kmdf")

    -- add flags for rule: wdk.tracewpp
    add_values("wdk.tracewpp.flags", "-func:TraceEvents(LEVEL,FLAGS,MSG,...)", "-func:Hexdump((LEVEL,FLAGS,MSG,...))")

    -- add files
    add_files("driver/*.c", {rule = "wdk.tracewpp"})
    add_files("driver/*.rc")

For more information on WDK rules, see: #159

win.sdk.application

Compile and generate the winsdk application.

-- add rules
add_rules("mode.debug", "mode.release")

-- define target
target("usbview")

    -- windows application
    add_rules("win.sdk.application")

    -- add files
    add_files("*.c", "*.rc")
    add_files("xmlhelper.cpp", {rule = "win.sdk.dotnet"})

wdk.sdk.dotnet

Used to specify certain c++ source files to be compiled as c++.net.

add_files("xmlhelper.cpp", {rule = "win.sdk.dotnet"})

For more information on WDK rules, see: #159

plugin.vsxmake.autoupdate

We can use this rule to automatically update the VS project file (when each build is completed) in the VS project generated by xmake project -k vsxmake.

add_rules("plugin.vsxmake.autoupdate")
target("test")
     set_kind("binary")
     add_files("src/*.c")

utils.symbols.export_all

Provided in v2.5.2 and above, we can use it to automatically export all dynamic library symbols. Currently, only the symbol export of windows dll target programs is supported, even if there is no export interface through __declspec(dllexport) in the code.
xmake will also automatically export all c interface symbols (there are too many c++ class library symbols, so I haven't exported them yet).

add_rules("mode.release", "mode.debug")

target("foo")
     set_kind("shared")
     add_files("src/foo.c")
     add_rules("utils.symbols.export_all")

target("test")
     set_kind("binary")
     add_deps("foo")
     add_files("src/main.c")

Related issue #1123

utils.symbols.export_list

We can define the list of exported symbols directly in xmake.lua, for example:

target("foo")
     set_kind("shared")
     add_files("src/foo.c")
     add_rules("utils.symbols.export_list", {symbols = {
         "add",
         "sub"}})

Alternatively, add a list of exported symbols in the *.export.txt file.

target("foo2")
     set_kind("shared")
     add_files("src/foo.c")
     add_files("src/foo.export.txt")
     add_rules("utils.symbols.export_list")

For a complete project example, see: Export Symbol Example

utils.install.cmake_importfiles

We can use this rule to export the .cmake file when installing the target library file for the library import and search of other cmake projects.

utils.install.pkgconfig_importfiles

We can use this rule to export the pkgconfig/.pc file when installing the target target library file for library import and search for other projects.

utils.bin2c

This rule can be used in versions above v2.5.7 to introduce some binary files into the project, and see them as c/c++ header files for developers to use to obtain the data of these files.

For example, we can embed some png/jpg resource files into the code in the project.

target("console")
    set_kind("binary")
    add_rules("utils.bin2c", {extensions = {".png", ".jpg"}})
    add_files("src/*.c")
    add_files("res/*.png", "res/*.jpg")

!> The setting of extensions is optional, the default extension is .bin

Then, we can import and use it through #include "filename.png.h", xmake will automatically generate the corresponding header file for you, and add the corresponding search directory.

static unsigned char g_png_data[] = {
    #include "image.png.h"
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    printf("image.png: %s, size: %d\n", g_png_data, sizeof(g_png_data));
    return 0;
}

The content of the generated header file is similar:

cat build/.gens/test/macosx/x86_64/release/rules/c++/bin2c/image.png.h
  0x68, 0x65, 0x6C, 0x6C, 0x6F, 0x20, 0x78, 0x6D, 0x61, 0x6B, 0x65, 0x21, 0x0A, 0x00

utils.glsl2spv

This rule can be used in v2.6.1 and above. Import glsl shader files such as *.vert/*.frag into the project, and then realize automatic compilation to generate *.spv files.

In addition, we also support binary embedding spv file data in the form of C/C++ header file, which is convenient for program use.

Compile and generate spv file

xmake will automatically call glslangValidator or glslc to compile shaders to generate .spv files, and then output them to the specified {outputdir = "build"} directory.

add_rules("mode.debug", "mode.release")

add_requires("glslang", {configs = {binaryonly = true}})

target("test")
    set_kind("binary")
    add_rules("utils.glsl2spv", {outputdir = "build"})
    add_files("src/*.c")
    add_files("src/*.vert", "src/*.frag")
    add_packages("glslang")

Note that the add_packages("glslang") here is mainly used to import and bind the glslangValidator in the glslang package to ensure that xmake can always use it.

Of course, if you have already installed it on your own system, you don’t need to bind this package additionally, but I still recommend adding it.

Compile and generate c/c++ header files

We can also use the bin2c module internally to generate the corresponding binary header file from the compiled spv file, which is convenient for direct import in user code. We only need to enable {bin2c = true}. :w

add_rules("mode.debug", "mode.release")

add_requires("glslang", {configs = {binaryonly = true}})

target("test")
    set_kind("binary")
    add_rules("utils.glsl2spv", {bin2c = true})
    add_files("src/*.c")
    add_files("src/*.vert", "src/*.frag")
    add_packages("glslang")

Then we can introduce in the code like this:

static unsigned char g_test_vert_spv_data[] = {
    #include "test.vert.spv.h"
};

static unsigned char g_test_frag_spv_data[] = {
    #include "test.frag.spv.h"
};

Similar to the usage of bin2c rules, see the complete example: glsl2spv example

python.library

We can use this rule to generate python library modules with pybind11, which will adjust the module name of the python library.

add_rules("mode.release", "mode.debug")
add_requires("pybind11")

target("example")
     add_rules("python.library")
     add_files("src/*.cpp")
     add_packages("pybind11")
     set_languages("c++11")

with soabi:

add_rules("mode.release", "mode.debug")
add_requires("pybind11")

target("example")
     add_rules("python.library", {soabi = true})
     add_files("src/*.cpp")
     add_packages("pybind11")
     set_languages("c++11")

rule

Defining rules

rule("markdown")
    set_extensions(".md", ".markdown")
    on_build_file(function (target, sourcefile, opt)
        os.cp(sourcefile, path.join(target:targetdir(), path.basename(sourcefile) .. ".html"))
    end)

rule:add_imports

Add imported modules for all custom scripts

For usage and description, please see: target:add_imports, the usage is the same.

rule:set_extensions

Setting the file extension type supported by the rule

Apply rules to files with these suffixes by setting the supported extension file types, for example:

-- Define a build rule for a markdown file
rule("markdown")
    set_extensions(".md", ".markdown")
    on_build_file(function (target, sourcefile, opt)
        os.cp(sourcefile, path.join(target:targetdir(), path.basename(sourcefile) .. ".html"))
    end)

target("test")
    set_kind("binary")

    -- Make the test target support the construction rules of the markdown file
    add_rules("markdown")

    -- Adding a markdown file to build
    add_files("src/*.md")
    add_files("src/*.markdown")

rule:on_load

Custom load script

The load script used to implement the custom rules will be executed when the target is loaded. You can customize some target configurations in it, for example:

rule("test")
    on_load(function (target)
        target:add("defines", "-DTEST")
    end)

rule:on_config

custom configuration script

After xmake config is executed, this script is executed before Build, which is usually used for configuration work before compilation. It differs from on_load in that on_load is executed as soon as the target is loaded, and the execution timing is earlier.

If some configuration cannot be configured prematurely in on_load, it can be configured in on_config.

In addition, its execution time is earlier than before_build, and the approximate execution flow is as follows:

on_load -> after_load -> on_config -> before_build -> on_build -> after_build

Custom link script

The link script used to implement the custom rules overrides the default link behavior of the applied target, for example:

rule("test")
    on_link(function (target)
    end)

rule:on_build

Custom compilation script

The build script used to implement the custom rules overrides the default build behavior of the target being applied, for example:

rule("markdown")
    on_build(function (target)
    end)

rule:on_clean

Custom cleanup script

The cleanup script used to implement the custom rules will override the default cleanup behavior of the applied target, for example:

rule("markdown")
    on_clean(function (target)
        -- remove sourcefile.html
    end)

rule:on_package

Custom packaging script

A packaging script for implementing custom rules that overrides the default packaging behavior of the target being applied, for example:

rule("markdown")
    on_package(function (target)
        -- package sourcefile.html
    end)

rule:on_install

Custom installation script

An installation script for implementing custom rules that overrides the default installation behavior of the target being applied, for example:

rule("markdown")
    on_install(function (target)
    end)

rule:on_uninstall

Custom Uninstall Script

An uninstall script for implementing custom rules that overrides the default uninstall behavior of the target being applied, for example:

rule("markdown")
    on_uninstall(function (target)
    end)

rule:on_build_file

Customizing the build script to process one source file at a time

rule("markdown")
    on_build_file(function (target, sourcefile, opt)
        print("%%%d: %s", opt.progress, sourcefile)
    end)

The third parameter opt is an optional parameter, which is used to obtain some information state during the compilation process. For example, opt.progress is the compilation progress of the current period.

rule:on_buildcmd_file

Custom batch compile script, process one source file at a time

This is a new interface added in version 2.5.2. The script inside will not directly construct the source file, but will construct a batch command line task through the batchcmds object.
When xmake actually executes the build, it executes these commands once.

This is very useful for project generator plugins such as xmake project, because third-party project files generated by the generator do not support the execution of built-in scripts such as on_build_files.

But the final result of on_buildcmd_files construction is a batch of original cmd command lines, which can be directly executed as custom commands for other project files.

In addition, compared to on_build_files, it also simplifies the implementation of compiling extension files, is more readable and easy to configure, and is more user-friendly.

rule("foo")
    set_extensions(".xxx")
    on_buildcmd_file(function (target, batchcmds, sourcefile, opt)
        batchcmds:vrunv("gcc", {"-o", objectfile, "-c", sourcefile})
        batchcmds:add_depfiles("/xxxxx/dependfile.h", ...)
        -- batchcmds:add_depvalues(...)
        -- batchcmds:set_depmtime(os.mtime(...))
        -- batchcmds:set_depcache("xxxx.d")
    end)

In addition to batchcmds:vrunv, we also support some other batch commands, such as:

batchcmds:show("hello %s", "xmake")
batchcmds:vrunv("gcc", {"-o", objectfile, "-c", sourcefile}, {envs = {LD_LIBRARY_PATH="/xxx"}})
batchcmds:mkdir("/xxx") - and cp, mv, rm, ln ..
batchcmds:compile(sourcefile_cx, objectfile, {configs = {includedirs = sourcefile_dir, languages ​​= (sourcekind == "cxx" and "c++11")}})
batchcmds:link(objectfiles, targetfile, {configs = {linkdirs = ""}})

At the same time, we also simplify the configuration of dependency execution in it. The following is a complete example:

rule("lex")
    set_extensions(".l", ".ll")
    on_buildcmd_file(function (target, batchcmds, sourcefile_lex, opt)

        - imports
        import("lib.detect.find_tool")

        - get lex
        local lex = assert(find_tool("flex") or find_tool("lex"), "lex not found!")

        - get c/c++ source file for lex
        local extension = path.extension(sourcefile_lex)
        local sourcefile_cx = path.join(target:autogendir(), "rules", "lex_yacc", path.basename(sourcefile_lex) .. (extension == ".ll" and ".cpp" or ".c"))

        - add objectfile
        local objectfile = target:objectfile(sourcefile_cx)
        table.insert(target:objectfiles(), objectfile)

        - add commands
        batchcmds:show_progress(opt.progress, "${color.build.object}compiling.lex %s", sourcefile_lex)
        batchcmds:mkdir(path.directory(sourcefile_cx))
        batchcmds:vrunv(lex.program, {"-o", sourcefile_cx, sourcefile_lex})
        batchcmds:compile(sourcefile_cx, objectfile)

        - add deps
        batchcmds:add_depfiles(sourcefile_lex)
        batchcmds:set_depmtime(os.mtime(objectfile))
        batchcmds:set_depcache(target:dependfile(objectfile))
    end)

For a detailed description and background of this, see: issue 1246

rule:on_build_files

Customizing the build script to process multiple source files at once

Most of the custom build rules, each time processing a single file, output a target file, for example: a.c => a.o

However, in some cases, we need to enter multiple source files together to build an object file, for example: a.c b.c d.c => x.o

For this situation, we can achieve this by customizing this script:

rule("markdown")
    on_build_files(function (target, sourcebatch, opt)
        -- build some source files
        for _, sourcefile in ipairs(sourcebatch.sourcefiles) do
            -- ...
        end
    end)

rule:on_buildcmd_files

Customize batch compiling script, process multiple source files at once

For a detailed description of this, see: rule:on_buildcmd_file

rule("foo")
     set_extensions(".xxx")
     on_buildcmd_files(function (target, batchcmds, sourcebatch, opt)
         for _, sourcefile in ipairs(sourcebatch.sourcefiles) do
             batchcmds:vrunv("gcc", {"-o", objectfile, "-c", sourcefile})
         end
     end)

Custom pre-link script

Execution scripts used to implement custom target links, for example:

rule("test")
    before_link(function (target)
    end)

rule:before_build

Custom pre-compilation script

Used to implement the execution script before the custom target is built, for example:

rule("markdown")
    before_build(function (target)
    end)

rule:before_clean

Custom pre-cleanup script

Used to implement the execution script before the custom target cleanup, for example:

rule("markdown")
    before_clean(function (target)
    end)

rule:before_package

Custom the pre-package script

Used to implement the execution script before the custom target is packaged, for example:

rule("markdown")
    before_package(function (target)
    end)

rule:before_install

Custom pre-installation script

Used to implement the execution script before the custom target installation, for example:

rule("markdown")
    before_install(function (target)
    end)

rule:before_uninstall

Custom pre-uninstall script

Used to implement the execution script before the custom target is uninstalled, for example:

rule("markdown")
    before_uninstall(function (target)
    end)

rule:before_build_file

Custom pre-compilation script to process one source file at a time

Similar to rule:on_build_file, but the timing of this interface is called before compiling a source file.
Generally used to preprocess some source files before compiling.

rule:before_buildcmd_file

Customize the pre-compilation batch script, process one source file at a time

Similar to the usage of rule:on_buildcmd_file, but the time when this interface is called is before compiling a certain source file.
It is generally used to pre-process certain source files before compilation.

rule:before_build_files

Customize pre-compilation scripts to process multiple source files at once

Similar to the usage of rule:on_build_files, but the time when this interface is called is before compiling some source files,
It is generally used to pre-process certain source files before compilation.

rule:before_buildcmd_files

Customize the pre-compilation batch script to process multiple source files at once

Similar to the usage of rule:on_buildcmd_files, but the time when this interface is called is before compiling some source files,
It is generally used to pre-process certain source files before compilation.

Custom post-linking script

The execution script used to implement the custom target link is similar to rule:after_link.

rule:after_build

Custom post-compilation script

The execution script used to implement the custom target build is similar to rule:before_build.

rule:after_clean

Custom post-cleaning script

The execution script used to implement the custom target cleanup is similar to rule:before_clean.

rule:after_package

Custom post-packaging script

The execution script used to implement the custom target package is similar to rule:before_package.

rule:after_install

Custom post-installation script

The execution script used to implement the custom target installation is similar to rule:before_install.

rule:after_uninstall

Custom post-uninstallation Script

The execution script used to implement the custom target uninstallation is similar to rule:before_uninstall.

rule:after_build_file

Custom post-compilation scripts to process one source file at a time

Similar to rule:on_build_file, but the timing of this interface is called after compiling a source file.
Generally used to post-process some compiled object files.

rule:after_buildcmd_file

Customize the compiled batch script, process one source file at a time

Similar to the usage of rule:on_buildcmd_file, but the time when this interface is called is after compiling a certain source file,
Generally used for post-processing some compiled object files.

rule:after_build_files

Customize the compiled script to process multiple source files at once

The usage is similar to rule:on_build_files, but the time when this interface is called is after some source files are compiled,
Generally used for post-processing some compiled object files.

rule:after_buildcmd_files

Customize the compiled batch script to process multiple source files at once

The usage is similar to rule:on_buildcmd_files, but the time when this interface is called is after compiling some source files,
Generally used for post-processing some compiled object files.

rule_end

End definition rules

This is optional. If you want to manually end the rule definition, you can call it:

rule("test")
    -- ..
rule_end()